The Story of Scripture, Part 12 – The Lion and the Lamb

John the Baptist was the one prophesied to come just before the Messiah, and to carry out a forerunning ministry in order to prepare the people. This he did, calling the people to turn from their sins, and then pointing them to their long awaited Messiah.

John 1:29;

[John]… saw Jesus coming toward him, and said, “Behold, the Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world! 

In reading through the Gospel accounts, it is revealed that Jesus was the fulfillment of all the types and shadows in the Old Testament. Indeed he was the very hope of Israel; the hope of Adam and Eve themselves; and the very fulfillment of the promise given to all who looked forward to it from that time of the garden onward. 

This fulfillment motif carries right through the New Testament. He came as none other than the second Adam and the true Israel. Indeed, many moments in the life and ministry of Jesus are recorded precisely so as to make this parallel clear. Like Adam, Christ was tempted by Satan directly. Like Israel, Christ was called to faithfulness during a wilderness trial period. Of course, where Adam had failed (along with Israel after him), it is shown through these events that only Christ was able to succeed in being perfectly obedient to God’s covenant requirements. Thus it is Christ, and Christ alone, who is deserving of the great eschatological Sabbath blessing. Yet, as the spotless sacrificial Lamb he had also come to receive the covenant sanction of death on behalf of his people.  

In this regard, when Jesus’ enemies asked Him to prove Himself, he simply said; 

John 2:19;

“Destroy this temple, and in three days I will raise it up.”

In this prediction, Jesus made reference to his own body as the true fulfillment of all that the temple had ever foreshadowed. Now it would be Jesus himself, and no longer a mere building, that would be the meeting place between God and men. The temple was always a vital reminder to the people of their need for a substitutionary sacrifice,  but now the ultimate sacrifice had come. He would be a substitute for his people in death, and so make a way to return to the fellowship that man had once enjoyed with God. To make this possible, Christ would have to die. However, in so doing he would defeat all of his enemies, and at the end be victorious over death itself.

Jesus was resurrected three days after the crucifixion, just as prophesied. Not only did this stand as a vital vindication of his ministry, but also a sign of his total triumph over evil. The Saviour had indeed come. All the promises had been fulfilled. Jesus of Nazareth had shown himself to be not only the sacrificial lamb promised to Israel, but also the very Lion of Judah; the mighty serpent-crushing Saviour first promised to Adam and Even in the garden. Added to this, Jesus had not merely made a way back to the garden, but rather to the final Sabbath glory first then offered to man.

The Story of Scripture, Part 9 – Saviour, Judge and King

Even after a period where Israel gave in to rebellion and unbelief, God kept his promise to give Israel the land. Under the leadership of Joshua, they entered into Canaan and took possession of their inheritance. Later, after even more rebellion and unbelief, God continued to show boundless grace to his people. Over and over again the people, through their sin, would allow themselves to be placed back into bondage. Each time, when they were at their lowest, God would send a judge to save them; each of these mighty men showing forth an important glimpse of the ultimate Judge and Saviour. 

Eventually, they were given a king named David, under whom they prospered. God made a covenant with David which was an important continuation of his first promise to Adam;

1Chr 17:11-12;

When your days are fulfilled to walk with your fathers, I will raise up your offspring after you, one of your own sons, and I will establish his kingdom. He shall build a house for me, and I will establish his throne forever. 

This was vital new revelation concerning the promised Messiah. The promise as it first came to Adam and Eve in the garden, revealed that the Saviour would be one born of a women (i.e., from mankind). This was then narrowed in focus so as to show that the one born of a women would be born in the lineage of Abraham and indeed part of the nation of Israel. Now, through the covenant made with David, it was shown that the Messiah would be a king, from David’s own royal lineage!

In this regard, much of David’s life served as a type and foreshadowing of the Christ. We are introduced to David as the humble shepherd who stands in the place of God’s people, doing battle on their behalf, and even gaining victory against the great foe (Goliath).  As David matures, he becomes the promised theocratic king of Israel, slaying God’s enemies and bringing his people into a settled prosperity.

While the nation of Israel flourished under David’s rule, it reached the peak of its glory during the reign of his son, Solomon. This too was purposed in showing forth the glories of the covenant promise. Once again:

. . . I will raise up your offspring after you, one of your own sons, and I will establish his kingdom. He shall build a house for me, and I will establish his throne forever. 

It was indeed through Solomon that the kingdom was established, and the temple built. Moreover, it was at this time that the kingdom of Israel (and the land of Canaan) found its most profound expression as a foreshadowing of the glories of the new heaven and the new earth itself.  In like manner to his father, much of Solomon’s life was also intended to serve as a display of the King still to come; the Great and Wise King.

The Story of Scripture, Part 4 – Light Shines Amidst the Darkness

Gen 4:25;

And Adam knew his wife again, and she bore a son and called his name Seth, for she said, “God has appointed for me another offspring instead of Abel, for Cain killed him.

Now exiled from Eden, Eve gave birth to her first son, Cain. Though she had surely anticipated that he would be the promised Savior, he turned out to be quite the opposite, even murdering his own brother and putting on full display what it would now be like to live in a fallen world.

Even so, sin spread rapidly; like an aggressive cancer. At the same time, however, we read of the way that God remained faithful to His promise, and started to preserve for himself a godly remnant.  Eve gave birth to another son, Seth, which then served to begin the lineage that would eventually lead to Christ, the promised Son. 

To Seth also a son was born, and he called his name Enosh. At that time people began to call upon the name of the LORD.

And so we see the beginnings of a theme and contrast that stays consistent throughout. The shining light of God’s promise against the background of vast, dark human rebellion.

In that regard, the next major figure in this lineage of grace, is Noah.

Gen 6:5-8;

The LORD saw that the wickedness of man was great in the earth, and that every intention of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually. And the LORD was sorry that he had made man on the earth, and it grieved him to his heart. So the LORD said, “I will blot out man whom I have created from the face of the land, man and animals and creeping things and birds of the heavens, for I am sorry that I have made them.” But Noah found favor in the eyes of the LORD. 

Once the effects of the fall were painfully evident, God unleashed judgement, and destroyed everything with a flood. However, because of the promise that he had made to Adam and Eve, God gave Noah instructions to build a boat that would keep him and his family safe. This was to act as a powerful foreshadowing of the predicament that man was in, and that his only hope was in the promise of grace through the coming Messiah. While the whole world will be subject to judgment, those (like Noah and his family), who have trusted in the promise of God’s word, would be saved. 

When the flood was over, God made a covenant with Noah: a covenant that promised the preservation of humanity. Though it had now been clearly shown that man deserved to be destroyed for their sins, God would nevertheless preserve a stage of humanity from whom the Saviour would come. In this sense, it would be by God’s common grace to all that the stage is preserved, so that special grace could be given to those who would place their trust in the Ark of God.

To confirm this, God established the rainbow as a covenant sign. The bow, which was an ancient symbol for war, would remind the world that the next time that God’s wrath would be aimed at man, it would be aimed upwards upon himself (in Jesus Christ) rather than downwards as it had been, upon the sons of men.

The Story of Scripture, Part 3 – Bad News and Good News

We ended on the last post, talking about Adam’s tragic failure, and the entry of sin. For the first time in human history, mankind began to run away from the presence of God. The whole world was now ruined by their rebellion. But the question was this: how would God respond to a world that had chosen to go its own way?

Firstly (as one might expect), God brought judgment. He told them that they would return to the dust. And while the idea of physical death was frightening enough, mankind would also face the reality of spiritual death and eternal judgment in hell.

At this point things would seem very dark indeed if it were not for the precious promise revealed in Gen 3:15.

“I will put enmity between you and the woman, and between your offspring and her offspring; he shall bruise your head, and you shall bruise his heel.”

Here, in seed form, is the first promise that God would send a Saviour. It is the first glorious fore-hailing of Christ. God promised to crush all the evil forces that Adam and Eve had unleashed in their foolish rebellion (Gen. 3:15). And it is really in this moment, just after our consideration of what was lost in the garden, that we are able to appreciate the purpose of this redemption most clearly. As Kline says: “The purpose of redemption is to bring to pass, in spite of the Fall, the realization of the eschatological goal of a consummate revelation of God’s Glory, as originally set for creation.”[1]

Put as simply as possible, a second Adam was needed, to do what the first Adam had failed to do. And this is exactly what is here promised. God told Adam and Eve that this salvation would come through their own offspring!Once again, we consider this image:

Can you imagine the incredible amount of joy and hope that they must have found in this promise?

Gen 3:20, says this: 

“The man called his wife’s name Eve, because she was the mother of all living.”

Adam and Eve go on to trust that God would save them through the coming Messiah. One day, there would be another federal head; another great prophet, priest and king — a second Adam. And even so, Adam named his wife ‘Eve’ – meaning, mother (not of the dead, as would otherwise have been the case) but instead; mother of the living, and this because of the coming Saviour.

Even so, God killed an innocent animal for their sake, as a foreshadowing of the very manner in which the promised Son would bring about their redemption.

Gen 3:21 ;

“And the LORD God made for Adam and for his wife garments of skins and clothed them.” 

God shed the blood (source of life) of the innocent as a substitute for the guilty so that they could be covered. However, until the foreshadowed reality was consummate, as a consequence of the fall mankind was no longer able to dwell in the presence of God.

In that regard, here is yet another haunting image to consider.

From this point, the next several millennia of human history are recorded for us in a few brief chapters (Gen. 3-11). It is a story of two interwoven developments. On the one hand, we see the increasing darkness of sin. On the other, we see God’s faithfulness to His gospel promise. We will explore these developments in the next post.

Notes;

 [1] Kline, M. G. (2006). God, Heaven and Har Magedon: A Covenantal Tale of Cosmos and Telos (p. 14). Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock Publishers.

The Story of Scripture, Part 2 – High Treason

In the last post we emphasized that the time in the garden was a time of probation for the first Adam. By working for six days and then resting on the seventh, God had already modeled for this first federal head, that if he would work to keep these commandments, that he too (along with all of his posterity after him) could enter into the covenant blessing of an eternal Sabbath rest; never again having to fear the possibility of disobedience to the Creator.

We also mentioned that during this period of probation, God placed one specific restriction upon them: they were not to eat from the tree in the middle of the garden. By submitting to God’s word, Adam and Eve would have the chance to learn the joy of living as trustful and dependant creatures.[1] “The Lord of the covenant, the Lord of the Edenic sanctuary in its double role of home-protectorate and temple, was thus man’s Father and his God.”[2] In this way, even as the second Adam would later demonstrate, “from the very beginning man was taught to pray trustingly: ‘Our Father which art in heaven,’ and to add worshipfully: ‘Hallowed be thy name.'”[3] . But also, due to Adam’s great eschatological hope of future sabbath kingdom blessing (of which the garden was but a prologue), “man would learn to continue his Lord’s prayer: “thy kingdom come, thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven.”[4]

Chapter three in Genesis sets the context for the entire Bible. At this time, a fallen angel (Satan) entered into the garden with all malice, duplicitously taking the form of a snake and offering to Adam and Eve another ‘word’. Deceitful and rebellious to the core, this word challenged the very goodness and truthfulness of the Great Suzerain, and promised more satisfaction than could be derived under their current treaty arrangement.

The evil one had thus revealed his rebellion, and this was the time for Adam to exercise his sacred office. He alone (as the great prophet, priest and king), was invested with the responsibility and authority “to repulse Satan’s profane encroachment into God’s sanctuary. . . Taking his stand as God’s warrior-priest, guardian of the holy ground of Har Magedon, he must declare the evil one evil, condemn his trespass, and repulse him. This task, signalized by the name of the tree of the knowing of good and evil, was indeed the critical task.” [5]

Tragically, as we know, Adam fails to discharge his duty. Indeed, he fails at multiple levels. At the heart of this failure, however, Adam and Eve are both shown to accept Satan’s word, and join in with the rebellion against Yahweh. And due to Adam’s kingly and federal office, this treasonous act had cosmic significance, sending “shock-waves throughout the whole of creation.”[6] The whole world was now ruined by their rebellion. And for the first time in human history, mankind began to run away from the presence of God. But, the real question was this: How would God respond to a world that had chosen to go its own way? We will look at God’s profound answer in the next post.

Notes:

  1. Bartholomew, C. and Goheen, M. The Story-Line of the Bible.
  2. Kline, M. G. (2006). Kingdom Prologue: Genesis Foundations for a Covenantal Worldview (p. 61). Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock Publishers.
  3. Ibid.
  4. Ibid.
  5. Kline, M. G. (2006). God, Heaven and Har Magedon: A Covenantal Tale of Cosmos and Telos (p. 68). Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock Publishers.
  6. Craig Bartholomew and Michael Goheen, “The Story-Line of the Bible”.

The Story of Scripture, Part 1 – Creation and Probation

In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth.

In this very first verse of the Bible (Gen 1:1) the curtain opens, as it were, and the great Biblical drama begins. God calls all things into being by His sovereign decree, and his work moves quickly to a profound climax: He creates a man (Hebrew: Adam), with the perfect moral law written on his heart. Adam is made in his very own image; a priest and protector of the garden-sanctuary; a holy prophet of the garden-covenant (holding to the Word of God alone); a great king, having dominion and stewardship over all the earth. Then, from the king is brought a queen: the first women. Not only was she a gentle and beautiful covenantal companion for him, but also a unique and powerful helper in the great task that he was given. Mankind then, were made to multiply, prosper and have dominion; and they were unlike any other creatures in the universe. Under the rule of their federal head, king Adam; they would live as one holy nation in this perfect paradise theocracy.

God himself, the great glory-Spirit, was fully present in this garden temple-sanctuary. Adam, the holy sanctuary priest, would enjoy a rich, perfect, and prophetic communion with the Lord. Indeed, if all carried on in this way, the lives of Adam and those under his federal care, would be rich and full, as they all together worshipped and delighted in their creator, and the many gifts that He had given to them.

But the climax of creation was not merely in the making of mankind, for even king Adam was but a vassal king and it was always to be clear that Eden was a protectorate under the shield of Yahweh, the Great Suzerain; and he alone carried the title: King of Kings and Lord of Lords. To keep this truth before his vassal, the Sovereign Creator entered into his rest, taking his seat as the Great King, on a throne of eternal Sabbath glory. 

It was at this time that the garden covenant was made with Adam. It was to be a covenant of works, with both the curse of death for any transgression of the heart-law (in either its moral or positive aspects), and reward of life for obedience to the same. Moreover, by working for six days and then resting on the seventh, God had already modeled for Adam, that if he would work to keep these commandments, then he too could enter into the covenant blessing of an eternal Sabbath rest. In this way, the Garden of Eden was a time of great probation for Adam. If, as the federal head of humanity, he could execute his task well, both he and his posterity (i.e. the entire human race), and indeed the whole earth, would be brought into the final state, and be allowed to receive the covenant blessing: Sabbath rest from their labour, never again having to fear that they might be disobedient; eternal paradise with God on earth; heaven itself.  

This was the garden covenant then; “According to the terms of this probation arrangement, the promised sabbath rest must be merited by obedience, while, on the other hand the hope of that blessing would be forfeited by disobedience.”[1] And in this way, “Eden had sabbatical significance as a prototypal stage of the royal rest covenanted to man beyond his probationary mission”.[2]

During this period of probation, the unique positive component of the law was this: they were not to eat from the tree in the middle of the garden. Even in this restriction, however, Adam would have the chance to learn the joy of living as a trustful and dependant creature.[3] But his “covenant obligations were not limited to this one duty of guarding the sacred garden. There were other, long-range requirements, assignments pertaining to his offices as king and priest. In the event of a successful probation man must carry out the kingdom commission by culturally forming his world—populating it, taking possession of it, appropriating its resources, ruling it (Gen 1:28). He was also to be engaged in the fundamental function of priestly ministry, that is, the worship of God[3] . . .Only by way of meritorious work might man arrive at the eternal sabbath. It was by performing the specific probation assignment stipulated in the Creator’s covenant of works with him that Adam must earn for himself and the human race the reward of entitlement to the consummated kingdom.”[4]

Notes:

  1. Kline, M. G. (2006). God, Heaven and Har Magedon: A Covenantal Tale of Cosmos and Telos (p. 63). Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock Publishers.
  2. Ibid., p. 42.
  3. Bartholomew, C. and Goheen, M. The Story-Line of the Bible.
  4. Kline, M. G. (2006). God, Heaven and Har Magedon: A Covenantal Tale of Cosmos and Telos (p. 68). Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock Publishers.
  5. Ibid., p. 65.