The Story of Scripture, Part 9 – Saviour, Judge and King

Even after a period where Israel gave in to rebellion and unbelief, God kept his promise to give Israel the land. Under the leadership of Joshua, they entered into Canaan and took possession of their inheritance. Later, after even more rebellion and unbelief, God continued to show boundless grace to his people. Over and over again the people, through their sin, would allow themselves to be placed back into bondage. Each time, when they were at their lowest, God would send a judge to save them; each of these mighty men showing forth an important glimpse of the ultimate Judge and Saviour. 

Eventually, they were given a king named David, under whom they prospered. God made a covenant with David which was an important continuation of his first promise to Adam;

1Chr 17:11-12;

When your days are fulfilled to walk with your fathers, I will raise up your offspring after you, one of your own sons, and I will establish his kingdom. He shall build a house for me, and I will establish his throne forever. 

This was vital new revelation concerning the promised Messiah. The promise as it first came to Adam and Eve in the garden, revealed that the Saviour would be one born of a women (i.e., from mankind). This was then narrowed in focus so as to show that the one born of a women would be born in the lineage of Abraham and indeed part of the nation of Israel. Now, through the covenant made with David, it was shown that the Messiah would be a king, from David’s own royal lineage!

In this regard, much of David’s life served as a type and foreshadowing of the Christ. We are introduced to David as the humble shepherd who stands in the place of God’s people, doing battle on their behalf, and even gaining victory against the great foe (Goliath).  As David matures, he becomes the promised theocratic king of Israel, slaying God’s enemies and bringing his people into a settled prosperity.

While the nation of Israel flourished under David’s rule, it reached the peak of its glory during the reign of his son, Solomon. This too was purposed in showing forth the glories of the covenant promise. Once again:

. . . I will raise up your offspring after you, one of your own sons, and I will establish his kingdom. He shall build a house for me, and I will establish his throne forever. 

It was indeed through Solomon that the kingdom was established, and the temple built. Moreover, it was at this time that the kingdom of Israel (and the land of Canaan) found its most profound expression as a foreshadowing of the glories of the new heaven and the new earth itself.  In like manner to his father, much of Solomon’s life was also intended to serve as a display of the King still to come; the Great and Wise King.

The Story of Scripture, Part 4 – Light Shines Amidst the Darkness

Gen 4:25;

And Adam knew his wife again, and she bore a son and called his name Seth, for she said, “God has appointed for me another offspring instead of Abel, for Cain killed him.

Now exiled from Eden, Eve gave birth to her first son, Cain. Though she had surely anticipated that he would be the promised Savior, he turned out to be quite the opposite, even murdering his own brother and putting on full display what it would now be like to live in a fallen world.

Even so, sin spread rapidly; like an aggressive cancer. At the same time, however, we read of the way that God remained faithful to His promise, and started to preserve for himself a godly remnant.  Eve gave birth to another son, Seth, which then served to begin the lineage that would eventually lead to Christ, the promised Son. 

To Seth also a son was born, and he called his name Enosh. At that time people began to call upon the name of the LORD.

And so we see the beginnings of a theme and contrast that stays consistent throughout. The shining light of God’s promise against the background of vast, dark human rebellion.

In that regard, the next major figure in this lineage of grace, is Noah.

Gen 6:5-8;

The LORD saw that the wickedness of man was great in the earth, and that every intention of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually. And the LORD was sorry that he had made man on the earth, and it grieved him to his heart. So the LORD said, “I will blot out man whom I have created from the face of the land, man and animals and creeping things and birds of the heavens, for I am sorry that I have made them.” But Noah found favor in the eyes of the LORD. 

Once the effects of the fall were painfully evident, God unleashed judgement, and destroyed everything with a flood. However, because of the promise that he had made to Adam and Eve, God gave Noah instructions to build a boat that would keep him and his family safe. This was to act as a powerful foreshadowing of the predicament that man was in, and that his only hope was in the promise of grace through the coming Messiah. While the whole world will be subject to judgment, those (like Noah and his family), who have trusted in the promise of God’s word, would be saved. 

When the flood was over, God made a covenant with Noah: a covenant that promised the preservation of humanity. Though it had now been clearly shown that man deserved to be destroyed for their sins, God would nevertheless preserve a stage of humanity from whom the Saviour would come. In this sense, it would be by God’s common grace to all that the stage is preserved, so that special grace could be given to those who would place their trust in the Ark of God.

To confirm this, God established the rainbow as a covenant sign. The bow, which was an ancient symbol for war, would remind the world that the next time that God’s wrath would be aimed at man, it would be aimed upwards upon himself (in Jesus Christ) rather than downwards as it had been, upon the sons of men.